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Tochitura with polenta


Wash the meat and cut it into cubes. The kaizer and sausages are also cut.

In a frying pan, fry the meat, sausages and kaizer one by one.

Cut the onion into scales and cook a little. Add over the onion, meat, sausages and kaizer.

Tomatoes are scalded and mixed until it becomes juice. Add over the meat.

Add enough water or soup to cover the meat and season with salt, bay leaves and thyme.

Put in the oven until it drops. 5 minutes before removing, add the wine.

The garlic is cut or crushed (I crushed it). It is added when we remove the tochitura (this way it will keep its flavor).

Grate the cheese on top and serve with egg yolks.

Serve with polenta.


Pork chop

23 comments:

I also have a plan. it is still very good.

Medi, I had been planning to make a tochitura for 3 months :) I kept postponing it because I wanted to prepare it like a book, but today I felt like it and I only made it with pork. Usually I put chicken, the beef seems too strong and too dark.

Thank you Man for this delicious recipe.

With pleasure, I hope you find on the blog other recipes that will catch your eye` :)

It is a delicious tochitura, I tried it last week and since then my future husband has been asking me all the time when I will make it. Today I prepared a big surprise for him :)), I made the tochitura again, I can't wait for him to come from work to see his reaction: p! Tomorrow I will try the famous fluffy donuts, I hope I don't laugh: P. Thanks for the recipes!

Tochitura is addictive, I felt it on my skin too :)) You don't have to worry, but for encouragement, I wish you good luck tomorrow with the donuts!

what a fall of red or white wine

I put red wine on the pork tochitura. But, if I only have white wine at hand, I use that one too, I just won't respect all the recipes and rules now with holiness :)

does it look like or is it the Dobrogean tochitura ?!

Thanks for the recipe, my family ate like outlaws. ))

With pleasure! You kind of made me think, I should rename the recipe, I think it would sound good "outlaw tochitura" :))

Off at last. I was a little upset that I had to cook today but I didn't know what. and you posted 2 recipes with potatoes one after the other and it didn't work. so I ran through your recipes and stopped at the tochitura. not to mention that I also chose the weekend menu. stuffed thighs. fish plate and dessert eclairs..but. there is always a gift. I can't disappoint you like you. )) adapt recipes. but thanks for the inspiration Lorena

I like the chosen menu, even if it doesn't have potatoes at all :) I think you shouldn't even mention that you adapted them, but only do it when you haven't found what to adapt - if it ever happens :))


National stew with polenta & # 8211 recipe from ancient times

In old cookbooks, you will find this name & # 8220National stew & # 8221. I was curious to test it and now I can say that in its simplicity it seemed to me the best of all that I registered in the blog. The unexpected good taste is given by the onion, which is in larger quantities than usual. And because I was afraid that the food would be too sweet, I added 3 tablespoons of homemade vinegar (click for recipe), which is a weak vinegar, and the result was a very balanced food with a very good taste. Be sure to serve it with polenta.

Preparation time 20 minutes

Cooking time 1 hour 30 minutes

Total time 1 hour 50 minutes

Ingredients

  • 750 g beef or pork
  • 6 medium onions
  • 2 lg lard or butter
  • 2-3 bell peppers
  • 7-8 tomatoes (summer)
  • 3 lg weak house vinegar or 1 lg balsamic vinegar

1. The meat is chosen from beef or beef breast, or pork. I heated 5 cups of water in a pot. I washed the meat and cut it into small pieces like a mouthful. I melted 1 lg of butter + 1 lg of oil in another non-stick pan and I browned it on all sides for maybe 7-8 minutes. I added hot water and boiled it filling periodically. In the end, about 1 + 1/2 cup of liquid should remain.
2. I cut the onion into thin slices (scales) and the pepper into thin slices (the book says fidelita, but it is a bit exaggerated). In a large frying pan with high edges I melted 1 lg of butter + 1 lg of oil and I hardened them until the onion softened, 7-8 minutes, and then I added the tomatoes in small slices. If it is not summer for fresh tomatoes to taste good, then they will be replaced with broth. I cooked a smaller amount. If they don't fit in the pan, when moving with the tomatoes, move everything to the pan with the meat, if it is at least three-quarters penetrated. Simmer until the meat is well cooked. If more fluid is needed, add more hot water.
3. Towards the end, add at least 3 lbs of homemade vinegar, which is weaker, or 1-2 lbs of balsamic vinegar to balance the weighted jam given by the onion.
It is a dish that I would never get bored of, necessarily accompanied by polenta stew.
I leave you links with other stews from the blog:
& # 8211 Szekler stew with sour cream sauce
& # 8211 Gulyas / Gulas Hungarian with meat and potatoes
& # 8211 Beef broth stew with red wine
& # 8211 Beef or pork chop with mushrooms
Liv (e) it!

About the Moldovan tochitura

A good guide to traditional Romanian dishes is the book of the late Radu Anton Roman & # 8211 Romanian dishes, wines and customs & # 8221. His tochitura recipe was very similar to that of the Bucovina chef from Brasov. In addition, Radu Anton Roman's recipe also includes the pork organs that we knew were put in a traditional Moldovan tochitura. If I haven't used them so far, now it's their turn! The result was fabulous!

meats used for the tochitura are the pulp (not very degreased), pork shoulder, neck and / or pork breast. You can make any combinations you want between them. In fact, the meat left over from the shaping of the pieces to the cutting of the pig is used. A kind of & # 8222pork alms & # 8221, as described by Radu. Fry everything and simmer in lard.

Heart, tongue, liver or kidneys they give a special texture to this tochitura. Of course, the individual cooking times of the ingredients must be taken into account in order not to get a talmes balmes or, on the contrary, some pieces of rubber. It's not so easy to make tochitura because if you put everything in a cauldron or pan from the beginning you don't get a satisfactory result. If the heart and tongue are put first, the liver and kidneys should land in the pot last because they have cooking times of a few minutes. You will see in the following what I am talking about.

Sausages used for tochitura are smoked but soft, fresh, not from the dry ones we eat as a sausage. Of course we recommend homemade sausages & # 8211 see our recipes here.

The wine helps cook these heavy meats, gives a great flavor and balances fats. Tochitura is also served with red, tanned wine and I don't see why the same wine would not be used to prepare it. There are also versions of tochitura with white wine. Red wine gives it a darker color but also a deeper aroma.

Although the aromatic herbs do not appear in the recipe mentioned above, thyme is indispensable in most recipes, successfully accompanying garlic (put at the end). Aromatic herbs also have a digestive role, we use a lot of cumin (in Transylvania and Banat) especially for fatter steaks.

The traditional platter of the tochitura is with polenta, scrambled eggs (or cutlery) and grated cheese on top. A multi-storey building, full of flavor.

I give you the quantities for 6-8 servings of Moldovan tochitura. This way is good fresh, hot. It can also be reheated but it no longer has the same charm.


Moldovan tochitura traditional recipe

Moldovan tochitura traditional recipe. The tender and reddish pieces of meat, pork organs and sausages & # 8222melted & # 8221 in lard, served with scrambled eggs and grated cheese (telemea). Great aromas of garlic, red wine and thyme. A hearty winter meal.

I've told you about before Moldovan tochitura here. Even though I am a Transylvanian get-beget, raised with paprika and goulash, I admit that I really liked the combination of tochitura tastes. At the beginning I ordered it through restaurants in Moldova and I noticed that the approach was very different: it was with sauce, without, it had lean meat, it was fatter. Nothing coherent. The truth is, there isn't one original recipe for Moldovan tochitura and that every housewife does as she learned from home.

It would be good for the chefs to agree and record a Moldovan tochitura recipe that is respected (with small variations) throughout the country because tourists are stunned by the multitude of dishes that are put on plates, all with the same name. In Hungary, when you order goulash or chicken bell peppers you get exactly what you need everywhere. Same in France when you ask for a Beef Bourguignon or in Italy when you ask for a pizza Margherita.

The culmination is that in Brasov I ate the best tochitura, prepared by a Bucovina resident. Since then, I still do it at home, even if I often adapt it (replacing the stitches with boiled quail eggs, for example or polenta with some potatoes). Everyone does what they want at home, right?

If it is made properly, the Moldovan tochitura looks like an extra tender low steak that you can eat with a fork, a kind of Romanian pull-apart. The meat must be broken down into fibers and they must be soft and juicy (not sticky and dry).


Moldovan tochitura traditional recipe

Moldovan tochitura traditional recipe. The tender and reddish pieces of meat, pork organs and sausages & # 8222melted & # 8221 in lard, served with scrambled eggs and grated cheese (telemea). Great aromas of garlic, red wine and thyme. A hearty winter meal.

I've told you about before Moldovan tochitura here. Even though I am a Transylvanian get-beget, raised with paprika and goulash, I admit that I really liked the combination of tochitura tastes. At the beginning I ordered it through restaurants in Moldova and I noticed that the approach was very different: it was with sauce, without, it had lean meat, it was fatter. Nothing coherent. The truth is, there isn't one original recipe for Moldovan tochitura and that every housewife does as she learned from home.

It would be good for the chefs to agree and record a Moldovan tochitura recipe that is respected (with small variations) throughout the country because tourists are stunned by the multitude of dishes that are put on plates, all with the same name. In Hungary, when you order goulash or chicken bell peppers you get exactly what you need everywhere. Same in France when you ask for a Beef Bourguignon or in Italy when you ask for a pizza Margherita.

The culmination is that in Brasov I ate the best tochitura, prepared by a Bucovina resident. Since then, I still do it at home, even if I often adapt it (replacing the stitches with boiled quail eggs, for example or polenta with some potatoes). Everyone does what they want at home, right?

If it is made properly, the Moldovan tochitura looks like an extra tender low steak that you can eat with a fork, a kind of Romanian pull-apart. The meat must be broken down into fibers and they must be soft and juicy (not sticky and dry).


About the Moldovan tochitura

A good guide to traditional Romanian dishes is the book of the late Radu Anton Roman - Romanian dishes, wines and customs ". His tochitura recipe was very similar to that of the Bucovina chef from Brasov. In addition, Radu Anton Roman's recipe also includes the pork organs that we knew were put in a traditional Moldovan tochitura. If I haven't used them so far, it's their turn! The result was fabulous!

meats used for the tochitura are the pulp (not very degreased), pork shoulder, neck and / or pork breast. You can make any combinations you want between them. In fact, the "falls" of meat left over from the shaping of the pieces to the cutting of the pig are used. A kind of "pig alms", as Radu describes it. Fry everything and simmer in lard.

Heart, tongue, liver or kidneys they give a special texture to this tochitura. Of course, the individual cooking times of the ingredients must be taken into account in order not to get a talmes balmes or, on the contrary, some pieces of rubber. It's not so easy to make tochitura because if you put everything in a cauldron or pan from the beginning you don't get a satisfactory result. If the heart and tongue are put first, the liver and kidneys should land in the pot last because they have cooking times of a few minutes. You will see in the following what I am talking about.

Sausages used for tochitura are smoked but soft, fresh, not from the dry ones we eat as a sausage. Of course we recommend homemade sausages - see our recipes here.

The wine helps cook these heavy meats, gives a great flavor and balances fats. Tochitura is also served with red, tanned wine and I don't see why the same wine would not be used to prepare it. There are also versions of tochitura with white wine. Red wine gives it a darker color but also a deeper aroma.

Although the aromatic herbs do not appear in the recipe mentioned above, thyme is indispensable in most recipes, successfully accompanying garlic (put at the end). Aromatic herbs also have a digestive role, we use a lot of cumin (in Transylvania and Banat) especially for fatter steaks.

The traditional "plating" of tochitura is with polenta, scrambled eggs (or cutlery) and grated cheese on top. A multi-storey building, full of flavor.

I give you the quantities for 6-8 servings of Moldovan tochitura. This way is good fresh, hot. It can also be reheated but it no longer has the same charm.


About the Moldovan tochitura

A good guide to traditional Romanian dishes is the book of the late Radu Anton Roman & # 8211 Romanian dishes, wines and customs & # 8221. His tochitura recipe was very similar to that of the Bucovina chef from Brasov. In addition, Radu Anton Roman's recipe also includes the pork organs that we knew were put in a traditional Moldovan tochitura. If I haven't used them so far, now it's their turn! The result was fabulous!

meats used for the tochitura are the pulp (not very degreased), pork shoulder, neck and / or pork breast. You can make any combinations you want between them. In fact, the meat left over from the shaping of the pieces to the cutting of the pig is used. A kind of & # 8222pork alms & # 8221, as described by Radu. Fry everything and simmer in lard.

Heart, tongue, liver or kidneys they give a special texture to this tochitura. Of course, the individual cooking times of the ingredients must be taken into account in order not to get a talmes balmes or, on the contrary, some pieces of rubber. It's not so easy to make tochitura because if you put everything in a cauldron or pan from the beginning you don't get a satisfactory result. If the heart and tongue are put first, the liver and kidneys should land in the pot last because they have cooking times of a few minutes. You will see in the following what I am talking about.

Sausages used for tochitura are smoked but soft, fresh, not from the dried ones we eat as sausage. Of course we recommend homemade sausages & # 8211 see our recipes here.

The wine helps cook these heavy meats, gives a great flavor and balances fats. Tochitura is also served with red, tanned wine and I don't see why the same wine would not be used to prepare it. There are also versions of tochitura with white wine. Red wine gives it a darker color but also a deeper aroma.

Although the aromatic herbs do not appear in the recipe mentioned above, thyme is indispensable in most recipes, successfully accompanying garlic (put at the end). Aromatic herbs also have a digestive role, we use a lot of cumin (in Transylvania and Banat) especially for fatter steaks.

The traditional platter of the tochitura is with polenta, scrambled eggs (or cutlery) and grated cheese on top. A multi-storey building, full of flavor.

I give you the quantities for 6-8 servings of Moldovan tochitura. This way is good fresh, hot. It can also be reheated but it does not have the same charm.


Oltenian tochitura with polenta

Cut the pork leg into cubes. The ribs are also cut into small cubes. Heat the oil in a pan and fry the salted and peppered pieces of meat. Remove the meat and brown the pieces of smoked ribs, which are then set aside.

Clean, wash and finely chop the mushrooms, onions and bell peppers and fry together in the oil in which the meat and ribs were fried.

Heat for 5 minutes, then add 150 ml of tomato juice and simmer. Add the chopped garlic, meat and ribs and let it boil 2-3 times together.

Serve the tochitura with polenta, you can sprinkle with chopped green parsley and possibly with grated cheese whoever wants.


Oltenian tochitura with polenta

Cut the pork leg into cubes. The ribs are also cut into small cubes. Heat the oil in a pan and fry the salted and peppered pieces of meat. Remove the meat and brown the pieces of smoked ribs, which are then set aside.

Clean, wash and finely chop the mushrooms, onions and bell peppers and fry together in the oil in which the meat and ribs were fried.

Heat for 5 minutes, then add 150 ml of tomato juice and simmer. Add the chopped garlic, meat and ribs and let it boil 2-3 times together.

Serve the tochitura with polenta, you can sprinkle with chopped green parsley and possibly with grated cheese whoever wants.


Oltenian tochitura with polenta

Cut the pork leg into cubes. The ribs are also cut into small cubes. Heat the oil in a pan and fry the salted and peppered pieces of meat. Remove the meat and brown the pieces of smoked ribs and then remove them.

Clean, wash and finely chop the mushrooms, onions and bell peppers and fry together in the oil in which the meat and ribs were fried.

Heat for 5 minutes, then add 150 ml of tomato juice and simmer. Add the chopped garlic, meat and ribs and let it boil 2-3 times together.

Serve the tochitura with polenta, you can sprinkle with chopped green parsley and possibly with grated cheese whoever wants.