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Michelin-Starred Chefs Head to Hong Kong


Langham Food & Wine Festival raises a glass in Hong Kong

Langham Food & Wine Festival

Celebrity chefs and award-winning wine producers are teaming up to present tasting menus, buffets, and wine tastings at the Langham Food & Wine Festival in Hong Kong from Sept. 13 to 23, 2012.

Michelin-starred chefs like Albert Roux of the three-Michelin-starred Le Gavroche in London, Angel Pascual of the now-shuttered Lluçanès Restaurant in Barcelona, Claude Bosi of Hibiscus in London, and Igor Macchia of La Credenza in Turin, Italy, are participating in the 11-day festival that takes place at Langham Hospitality Group’s two hotels, The Langham, Hong Kong and Langham Place, Mongkok.

The Michelin-starred chefs are collaborating with wine producers and chefs from Shanghai and Hong Kong to prepare their signature dishes in the hotel restaurants. They will also be leading master classes. Chances to sample the signature dishes include the daily Buffet with Stars in which Roux, Pascual, and Bosi will prepare a special spread along with a sustainable seafood cooking station and beef and pork charcuterie.

Master classes include Gontran Cherrier’s demonstration of a Tiffin afternoon tea, Philippe Mouchel’s demonstration of three of his signature dishes, and Benjamin Bayly’s demonstration of two signature dishes paired with Pasquale wine from New Zealand.

A highlight of the Langham Food & Wine Festival is a charity auction for a private six-course dinner for eight paired with Frescobaldi wines presented by Michelin-starred chef Igor Macchia in The Penthouse Suite of Langham Place, Mongkok on Sept. 20. Bids for this dinner start at HK$20,000 (US$2,578.57) with all proceeds to be donated to the Hong Kong Playground Association.

Tickets for each event are sold separately through the Langham Food & Wine Festival website.

Lauren Mack is the Travel Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @lmack.


For Michelin-Star Dumplings and Cantonese Fine Dining, Head to Hong Kong’s Kowloon Neighborhood

The scene at Mongkok Local Market. All photos by Berit Baugher.

No need to stay on Hong Kong Island for a good meal. Foodies can make an epic, finger-licking tour for themselves on the mainland, in Kowloon.

HONG KONG &mdash If there was one takeaway from my week-long trip to Hong Kong, it would be that the city and its seven million inhabitants take Michelin stars very seriously. Considered the culinary capital of Asia, Hong Kong’s rich and varied food scene has garnered a reputation as one of the world’s best places to dine, so it was understandable (and amusing) to discover just how much locals talk about the accreditation. From the taxi driver who picked me up at the airport to the proprietor at Charms Tailor who made my fiancé a beautiful bespoke suit, talk of Hong Kong’s 74 Michelin-starred restaurants came up in just about every conversation.

On the long list of things I like to do and see in new cities, fancy restaurants usually land somewhere near the bottom. I like a nice meal, but find myself happiest in a cute cafe with major design cred or a small hole-in-the-wall that’s been around for a few decades. This trip, I decided to switch things up and dig into the fine dining scene by planning an epic food day that included stops at two of the city's most famous Michelin-approved restaurants.

Ginger is in high demand at Hong Kong's local wet markets. Local fruits and vegetables for sale at the wet market. A butcher at work.

The morning started with room service in my spacious Harbor View room at the classically-styled InterContinental Hong Kong, where I set myself up in front of the window to take in Hong Kong Island’s spectacular skyline. Having spent time at the top of the International Commerce Centre and Victoria’s Peak, I can confidently say that it is one of the best vantage points in the city.

I made my way down to the lobby, where I met executive sous chef Simon Kwok for a tour of a local wet market. In addition to manning the kitchen at the hotel’s massive breakfast buffet, the knowledgeable chef is available to take guests on guided food excursions around the city.

On any given day in Hong Kong, you are bound to come across a few wet markets, but for the full experience (cages filled with clucking chickens, streets lined with plastic bins of flapping fish, and baskets upon baskets of tropical fruit) Mongkok Local Market is the spot. Navigating a wet market is easy enough, but having Kwok on hand made it feel more like an experience. Much of the fruit for sale were new-to-me species that he was able to identify and describe. For picky eaters like me, it was nice having someone explain the snacks, including a bowl of fresh tofu sprinkled with brown sugar that Kwok described as a favorite childhood treat. Pro tip: When visiting wet markets, it is always smart to wear a pair of close-toed shoes, as the streets are filled with all kinds of unidentifiable liquids.

Executive chef Lau Yiu Fai at work. A few of our dumplings.

From there I made my way back to the hotel to wash up before heading downstairs for a private dim sum class. Most luxury hotels in HK, including mine, have several notable restaurants, including Rech by Alain Ducasse (the first international outpost of the famous Paris seafood restaurant and recipient of one Michelin star) and Nobu, but Yan Toh Heen is the one you don’t want to miss. The two Michelin-star restaurant dishes up outstanding Cantonese cuisine in an elegant dining room with hand-carved jade accents and stunning harbor views. Along with one of his sous chefs, executive chef Lau Yiu Fai took me through an hour-long crash course in the art of dumpling making. From the easy-to-master triangle fold to the more complex pleated crescent, I learned the various techniques used to craft beautiful dumplings.

A sampling of Yan Toh Heen's famous dumplings. Basil dragon pearls served with ginger ice cream.

Lunch in the dining room started off with steaming baskets of dumplings we had created, followed by the restaurant’s famous Peking duck, which must be ordered at least 24 hours in advance. The dish is served over two courses. First, the crispy skin is paired with thin pancakes and an elaborate display of condiments and sauces. Later, a plate of minced duck is accompanied by crisp lettuce wraps. A sampling of the restaurant’s most beloved deserts followed, including a striking bowl of creamy ginger panna cotta layered with black basil seeds and a refreshing scoop of ginger ice cream. In traditional Chinese style, the meal ended with a piping hot cup of green tea, to help with digestion.

Michelin star food for a song at Tim Ho Wan.

Later that evening, after a much needed siesta, I left the hotel for an hour-long walk to the final stop of my food-packed agenda. A subway or bus could have had me there in less than a half hour, but exercise sounded like a good idea before tucking into my next meal. The Sham Shui Po outpost of Tim Ho Wan, a Hong Kong-based dim sum chain, is the lowest priced restaurant in the world to get a Michelin star. And with dinner for two coming in at around $25 USD, diners can expect to feast at a shockingly affordable price point. I was able to spot the unassuming restaurant thanks to a small line near the door, but, to my surprise, I only had to wait about fifteen minutes. English menus (if requested) offer 25 different dim sum choices. Highlights included baked bun with barbecue pork (a restaurant speciality) and steamed beef balls. The meal was good, but not necessarily worth all the hype, in my opinion. Nonetheless, it’s worth the trek if you like the idea of eating a Michelin star for the price of a sandwich.


For Michelin-Star Dumplings and Cantonese Fine Dining, Head to Hong Kong’s Kowloon Neighborhood

The scene at Mongkok Local Market. All photos by Berit Baugher.

No need to stay on Hong Kong Island for a good meal. Foodies can make an epic, finger-licking tour for themselves on the mainland, in Kowloon.

HONG KONG &mdash If there was one takeaway from my week-long trip to Hong Kong, it would be that the city and its seven million inhabitants take Michelin stars very seriously. Considered the culinary capital of Asia, Hong Kong’s rich and varied food scene has garnered a reputation as one of the world’s best places to dine, so it was understandable (and amusing) to discover just how much locals talk about the accreditation. From the taxi driver who picked me up at the airport to the proprietor at Charms Tailor who made my fiancé a beautiful bespoke suit, talk of Hong Kong’s 74 Michelin-starred restaurants came up in just about every conversation.

On the long list of things I like to do and see in new cities, fancy restaurants usually land somewhere near the bottom. I like a nice meal, but find myself happiest in a cute cafe with major design cred or a small hole-in-the-wall that’s been around for a few decades. This trip, I decided to switch things up and dig into the fine dining scene by planning an epic food day that included stops at two of the city's most famous Michelin-approved restaurants.

Ginger is in high demand at Hong Kong's local wet markets. Local fruits and vegetables for sale at the wet market. A butcher at work.

The morning started with room service in my spacious Harbor View room at the classically-styled InterContinental Hong Kong, where I set myself up in front of the window to take in Hong Kong Island’s spectacular skyline. Having spent time at the top of the International Commerce Centre and Victoria’s Peak, I can confidently say that it is one of the best vantage points in the city.

I made my way down to the lobby, where I met executive sous chef Simon Kwok for a tour of a local wet market. In addition to manning the kitchen at the hotel’s massive breakfast buffet, the knowledgeable chef is available to take guests on guided food excursions around the city.

On any given day in Hong Kong, you are bound to come across a few wet markets, but for the full experience (cages filled with clucking chickens, streets lined with plastic bins of flapping fish, and baskets upon baskets of tropical fruit) Mongkok Local Market is the spot. Navigating a wet market is easy enough, but having Kwok on hand made it feel more like an experience. Much of the fruit for sale were new-to-me species that he was able to identify and describe. For picky eaters like me, it was nice having someone explain the snacks, including a bowl of fresh tofu sprinkled with brown sugar that Kwok described as a favorite childhood treat. Pro tip: When visiting wet markets, it is always smart to wear a pair of close-toed shoes, as the streets are filled with all kinds of unidentifiable liquids.

Executive chef Lau Yiu Fai at work. A few of our dumplings.

From there I made my way back to the hotel to wash up before heading downstairs for a private dim sum class. Most luxury hotels in HK, including mine, have several notable restaurants, including Rech by Alain Ducasse (the first international outpost of the famous Paris seafood restaurant and recipient of one Michelin star) and Nobu, but Yan Toh Heen is the one you don’t want to miss. The two Michelin-star restaurant dishes up outstanding Cantonese cuisine in an elegant dining room with hand-carved jade accents and stunning harbor views. Along with one of his sous chefs, executive chef Lau Yiu Fai took me through an hour-long crash course in the art of dumpling making. From the easy-to-master triangle fold to the more complex pleated crescent, I learned the various techniques used to craft beautiful dumplings.

A sampling of Yan Toh Heen's famous dumplings. Basil dragon pearls served with ginger ice cream.

Lunch in the dining room started off with steaming baskets of dumplings we had created, followed by the restaurant’s famous Peking duck, which must be ordered at least 24 hours in advance. The dish is served over two courses. First, the crispy skin is paired with thin pancakes and an elaborate display of condiments and sauces. Later, a plate of minced duck is accompanied by crisp lettuce wraps. A sampling of the restaurant’s most beloved deserts followed, including a striking bowl of creamy ginger panna cotta layered with black basil seeds and a refreshing scoop of ginger ice cream. In traditional Chinese style, the meal ended with a piping hot cup of green tea, to help with digestion.

Michelin star food for a song at Tim Ho Wan.

Later that evening, after a much needed siesta, I left the hotel for an hour-long walk to the final stop of my food-packed agenda. A subway or bus could have had me there in less than a half hour, but exercise sounded like a good idea before tucking into my next meal. The Sham Shui Po outpost of Tim Ho Wan, a Hong Kong-based dim sum chain, is the lowest priced restaurant in the world to get a Michelin star. And with dinner for two coming in at around $25 USD, diners can expect to feast at a shockingly affordable price point. I was able to spot the unassuming restaurant thanks to a small line near the door, but, to my surprise, I only had to wait about fifteen minutes. English menus (if requested) offer 25 different dim sum choices. Highlights included baked bun with barbecue pork (a restaurant speciality) and steamed beef balls. The meal was good, but not necessarily worth all the hype, in my opinion. Nonetheless, it’s worth the trek if you like the idea of eating a Michelin star for the price of a sandwich.


For Michelin-Star Dumplings and Cantonese Fine Dining, Head to Hong Kong’s Kowloon Neighborhood

The scene at Mongkok Local Market. All photos by Berit Baugher.

No need to stay on Hong Kong Island for a good meal. Foodies can make an epic, finger-licking tour for themselves on the mainland, in Kowloon.

HONG KONG &mdash If there was one takeaway from my week-long trip to Hong Kong, it would be that the city and its seven million inhabitants take Michelin stars very seriously. Considered the culinary capital of Asia, Hong Kong’s rich and varied food scene has garnered a reputation as one of the world’s best places to dine, so it was understandable (and amusing) to discover just how much locals talk about the accreditation. From the taxi driver who picked me up at the airport to the proprietor at Charms Tailor who made my fiancé a beautiful bespoke suit, talk of Hong Kong’s 74 Michelin-starred restaurants came up in just about every conversation.

On the long list of things I like to do and see in new cities, fancy restaurants usually land somewhere near the bottom. I like a nice meal, but find myself happiest in a cute cafe with major design cred or a small hole-in-the-wall that’s been around for a few decades. This trip, I decided to switch things up and dig into the fine dining scene by planning an epic food day that included stops at two of the city's most famous Michelin-approved restaurants.

Ginger is in high demand at Hong Kong's local wet markets. Local fruits and vegetables for sale at the wet market. A butcher at work.

The morning started with room service in my spacious Harbor View room at the classically-styled InterContinental Hong Kong, where I set myself up in front of the window to take in Hong Kong Island’s spectacular skyline. Having spent time at the top of the International Commerce Centre and Victoria’s Peak, I can confidently say that it is one of the best vantage points in the city.

I made my way down to the lobby, where I met executive sous chef Simon Kwok for a tour of a local wet market. In addition to manning the kitchen at the hotel’s massive breakfast buffet, the knowledgeable chef is available to take guests on guided food excursions around the city.

On any given day in Hong Kong, you are bound to come across a few wet markets, but for the full experience (cages filled with clucking chickens, streets lined with plastic bins of flapping fish, and baskets upon baskets of tropical fruit) Mongkok Local Market is the spot. Navigating a wet market is easy enough, but having Kwok on hand made it feel more like an experience. Much of the fruit for sale were new-to-me species that he was able to identify and describe. For picky eaters like me, it was nice having someone explain the snacks, including a bowl of fresh tofu sprinkled with brown sugar that Kwok described as a favorite childhood treat. Pro tip: When visiting wet markets, it is always smart to wear a pair of close-toed shoes, as the streets are filled with all kinds of unidentifiable liquids.

Executive chef Lau Yiu Fai at work. A few of our dumplings.

From there I made my way back to the hotel to wash up before heading downstairs for a private dim sum class. Most luxury hotels in HK, including mine, have several notable restaurants, including Rech by Alain Ducasse (the first international outpost of the famous Paris seafood restaurant and recipient of one Michelin star) and Nobu, but Yan Toh Heen is the one you don’t want to miss. The two Michelin-star restaurant dishes up outstanding Cantonese cuisine in an elegant dining room with hand-carved jade accents and stunning harbor views. Along with one of his sous chefs, executive chef Lau Yiu Fai took me through an hour-long crash course in the art of dumpling making. From the easy-to-master triangle fold to the more complex pleated crescent, I learned the various techniques used to craft beautiful dumplings.

A sampling of Yan Toh Heen's famous dumplings. Basil dragon pearls served with ginger ice cream.

Lunch in the dining room started off with steaming baskets of dumplings we had created, followed by the restaurant’s famous Peking duck, which must be ordered at least 24 hours in advance. The dish is served over two courses. First, the crispy skin is paired with thin pancakes and an elaborate display of condiments and sauces. Later, a plate of minced duck is accompanied by crisp lettuce wraps. A sampling of the restaurant’s most beloved deserts followed, including a striking bowl of creamy ginger panna cotta layered with black basil seeds and a refreshing scoop of ginger ice cream. In traditional Chinese style, the meal ended with a piping hot cup of green tea, to help with digestion.

Michelin star food for a song at Tim Ho Wan.

Later that evening, after a much needed siesta, I left the hotel for an hour-long walk to the final stop of my food-packed agenda. A subway or bus could have had me there in less than a half hour, but exercise sounded like a good idea before tucking into my next meal. The Sham Shui Po outpost of Tim Ho Wan, a Hong Kong-based dim sum chain, is the lowest priced restaurant in the world to get a Michelin star. And with dinner for two coming in at around $25 USD, diners can expect to feast at a shockingly affordable price point. I was able to spot the unassuming restaurant thanks to a small line near the door, but, to my surprise, I only had to wait about fifteen minutes. English menus (if requested) offer 25 different dim sum choices. Highlights included baked bun with barbecue pork (a restaurant speciality) and steamed beef balls. The meal was good, but not necessarily worth all the hype, in my opinion. Nonetheless, it’s worth the trek if you like the idea of eating a Michelin star for the price of a sandwich.


For Michelin-Star Dumplings and Cantonese Fine Dining, Head to Hong Kong’s Kowloon Neighborhood

The scene at Mongkok Local Market. All photos by Berit Baugher.

No need to stay on Hong Kong Island for a good meal. Foodies can make an epic, finger-licking tour for themselves on the mainland, in Kowloon.

HONG KONG &mdash If there was one takeaway from my week-long trip to Hong Kong, it would be that the city and its seven million inhabitants take Michelin stars very seriously. Considered the culinary capital of Asia, Hong Kong’s rich and varied food scene has garnered a reputation as one of the world’s best places to dine, so it was understandable (and amusing) to discover just how much locals talk about the accreditation. From the taxi driver who picked me up at the airport to the proprietor at Charms Tailor who made my fiancé a beautiful bespoke suit, talk of Hong Kong’s 74 Michelin-starred restaurants came up in just about every conversation.

On the long list of things I like to do and see in new cities, fancy restaurants usually land somewhere near the bottom. I like a nice meal, but find myself happiest in a cute cafe with major design cred or a small hole-in-the-wall that’s been around for a few decades. This trip, I decided to switch things up and dig into the fine dining scene by planning an epic food day that included stops at two of the city's most famous Michelin-approved restaurants.

Ginger is in high demand at Hong Kong's local wet markets. Local fruits and vegetables for sale at the wet market. A butcher at work.

The morning started with room service in my spacious Harbor View room at the classically-styled InterContinental Hong Kong, where I set myself up in front of the window to take in Hong Kong Island’s spectacular skyline. Having spent time at the top of the International Commerce Centre and Victoria’s Peak, I can confidently say that it is one of the best vantage points in the city.

I made my way down to the lobby, where I met executive sous chef Simon Kwok for a tour of a local wet market. In addition to manning the kitchen at the hotel’s massive breakfast buffet, the knowledgeable chef is available to take guests on guided food excursions around the city.

On any given day in Hong Kong, you are bound to come across a few wet markets, but for the full experience (cages filled with clucking chickens, streets lined with plastic bins of flapping fish, and baskets upon baskets of tropical fruit) Mongkok Local Market is the spot. Navigating a wet market is easy enough, but having Kwok on hand made it feel more like an experience. Much of the fruit for sale were new-to-me species that he was able to identify and describe. For picky eaters like me, it was nice having someone explain the snacks, including a bowl of fresh tofu sprinkled with brown sugar that Kwok described as a favorite childhood treat. Pro tip: When visiting wet markets, it is always smart to wear a pair of close-toed shoes, as the streets are filled with all kinds of unidentifiable liquids.

Executive chef Lau Yiu Fai at work. A few of our dumplings.

From there I made my way back to the hotel to wash up before heading downstairs for a private dim sum class. Most luxury hotels in HK, including mine, have several notable restaurants, including Rech by Alain Ducasse (the first international outpost of the famous Paris seafood restaurant and recipient of one Michelin star) and Nobu, but Yan Toh Heen is the one you don’t want to miss. The two Michelin-star restaurant dishes up outstanding Cantonese cuisine in an elegant dining room with hand-carved jade accents and stunning harbor views. Along with one of his sous chefs, executive chef Lau Yiu Fai took me through an hour-long crash course in the art of dumpling making. From the easy-to-master triangle fold to the more complex pleated crescent, I learned the various techniques used to craft beautiful dumplings.

A sampling of Yan Toh Heen's famous dumplings. Basil dragon pearls served with ginger ice cream.

Lunch in the dining room started off with steaming baskets of dumplings we had created, followed by the restaurant’s famous Peking duck, which must be ordered at least 24 hours in advance. The dish is served over two courses. First, the crispy skin is paired with thin pancakes and an elaborate display of condiments and sauces. Later, a plate of minced duck is accompanied by crisp lettuce wraps. A sampling of the restaurant’s most beloved deserts followed, including a striking bowl of creamy ginger panna cotta layered with black basil seeds and a refreshing scoop of ginger ice cream. In traditional Chinese style, the meal ended with a piping hot cup of green tea, to help with digestion.

Michelin star food for a song at Tim Ho Wan.

Later that evening, after a much needed siesta, I left the hotel for an hour-long walk to the final stop of my food-packed agenda. A subway or bus could have had me there in less than a half hour, but exercise sounded like a good idea before tucking into my next meal. The Sham Shui Po outpost of Tim Ho Wan, a Hong Kong-based dim sum chain, is the lowest priced restaurant in the world to get a Michelin star. And with dinner for two coming in at around $25 USD, diners can expect to feast at a shockingly affordable price point. I was able to spot the unassuming restaurant thanks to a small line near the door, but, to my surprise, I only had to wait about fifteen minutes. English menus (if requested) offer 25 different dim sum choices. Highlights included baked bun with barbecue pork (a restaurant speciality) and steamed beef balls. The meal was good, but not necessarily worth all the hype, in my opinion. Nonetheless, it’s worth the trek if you like the idea of eating a Michelin star for the price of a sandwich.


For Michelin-Star Dumplings and Cantonese Fine Dining, Head to Hong Kong’s Kowloon Neighborhood

The scene at Mongkok Local Market. All photos by Berit Baugher.

No need to stay on Hong Kong Island for a good meal. Foodies can make an epic, finger-licking tour for themselves on the mainland, in Kowloon.

HONG KONG &mdash If there was one takeaway from my week-long trip to Hong Kong, it would be that the city and its seven million inhabitants take Michelin stars very seriously. Considered the culinary capital of Asia, Hong Kong’s rich and varied food scene has garnered a reputation as one of the world’s best places to dine, so it was understandable (and amusing) to discover just how much locals talk about the accreditation. From the taxi driver who picked me up at the airport to the proprietor at Charms Tailor who made my fiancé a beautiful bespoke suit, talk of Hong Kong’s 74 Michelin-starred restaurants came up in just about every conversation.

On the long list of things I like to do and see in new cities, fancy restaurants usually land somewhere near the bottom. I like a nice meal, but find myself happiest in a cute cafe with major design cred or a small hole-in-the-wall that’s been around for a few decades. This trip, I decided to switch things up and dig into the fine dining scene by planning an epic food day that included stops at two of the city's most famous Michelin-approved restaurants.

Ginger is in high demand at Hong Kong's local wet markets. Local fruits and vegetables for sale at the wet market. A butcher at work.

The morning started with room service in my spacious Harbor View room at the classically-styled InterContinental Hong Kong, where I set myself up in front of the window to take in Hong Kong Island’s spectacular skyline. Having spent time at the top of the International Commerce Centre and Victoria’s Peak, I can confidently say that it is one of the best vantage points in the city.

I made my way down to the lobby, where I met executive sous chef Simon Kwok for a tour of a local wet market. In addition to manning the kitchen at the hotel’s massive breakfast buffet, the knowledgeable chef is available to take guests on guided food excursions around the city.

On any given day in Hong Kong, you are bound to come across a few wet markets, but for the full experience (cages filled with clucking chickens, streets lined with plastic bins of flapping fish, and baskets upon baskets of tropical fruit) Mongkok Local Market is the spot. Navigating a wet market is easy enough, but having Kwok on hand made it feel more like an experience. Much of the fruit for sale were new-to-me species that he was able to identify and describe. For picky eaters like me, it was nice having someone explain the snacks, including a bowl of fresh tofu sprinkled with brown sugar that Kwok described as a favorite childhood treat. Pro tip: When visiting wet markets, it is always smart to wear a pair of close-toed shoes, as the streets are filled with all kinds of unidentifiable liquids.

Executive chef Lau Yiu Fai at work. A few of our dumplings.

From there I made my way back to the hotel to wash up before heading downstairs for a private dim sum class. Most luxury hotels in HK, including mine, have several notable restaurants, including Rech by Alain Ducasse (the first international outpost of the famous Paris seafood restaurant and recipient of one Michelin star) and Nobu, but Yan Toh Heen is the one you don’t want to miss. The two Michelin-star restaurant dishes up outstanding Cantonese cuisine in an elegant dining room with hand-carved jade accents and stunning harbor views. Along with one of his sous chefs, executive chef Lau Yiu Fai took me through an hour-long crash course in the art of dumpling making. From the easy-to-master triangle fold to the more complex pleated crescent, I learned the various techniques used to craft beautiful dumplings.

A sampling of Yan Toh Heen's famous dumplings. Basil dragon pearls served with ginger ice cream.

Lunch in the dining room started off with steaming baskets of dumplings we had created, followed by the restaurant’s famous Peking duck, which must be ordered at least 24 hours in advance. The dish is served over two courses. First, the crispy skin is paired with thin pancakes and an elaborate display of condiments and sauces. Later, a plate of minced duck is accompanied by crisp lettuce wraps. A sampling of the restaurant’s most beloved deserts followed, including a striking bowl of creamy ginger panna cotta layered with black basil seeds and a refreshing scoop of ginger ice cream. In traditional Chinese style, the meal ended with a piping hot cup of green tea, to help with digestion.

Michelin star food for a song at Tim Ho Wan.

Later that evening, after a much needed siesta, I left the hotel for an hour-long walk to the final stop of my food-packed agenda. A subway or bus could have had me there in less than a half hour, but exercise sounded like a good idea before tucking into my next meal. The Sham Shui Po outpost of Tim Ho Wan, a Hong Kong-based dim sum chain, is the lowest priced restaurant in the world to get a Michelin star. And with dinner for two coming in at around $25 USD, diners can expect to feast at a shockingly affordable price point. I was able to spot the unassuming restaurant thanks to a small line near the door, but, to my surprise, I only had to wait about fifteen minutes. English menus (if requested) offer 25 different dim sum choices. Highlights included baked bun with barbecue pork (a restaurant speciality) and steamed beef balls. The meal was good, but not necessarily worth all the hype, in my opinion. Nonetheless, it’s worth the trek if you like the idea of eating a Michelin star for the price of a sandwich.


For Michelin-Star Dumplings and Cantonese Fine Dining, Head to Hong Kong’s Kowloon Neighborhood

The scene at Mongkok Local Market. All photos by Berit Baugher.

No need to stay on Hong Kong Island for a good meal. Foodies can make an epic, finger-licking tour for themselves on the mainland, in Kowloon.

HONG KONG &mdash If there was one takeaway from my week-long trip to Hong Kong, it would be that the city and its seven million inhabitants take Michelin stars very seriously. Considered the culinary capital of Asia, Hong Kong’s rich and varied food scene has garnered a reputation as one of the world’s best places to dine, so it was understandable (and amusing) to discover just how much locals talk about the accreditation. From the taxi driver who picked me up at the airport to the proprietor at Charms Tailor who made my fiancé a beautiful bespoke suit, talk of Hong Kong’s 74 Michelin-starred restaurants came up in just about every conversation.

On the long list of things I like to do and see in new cities, fancy restaurants usually land somewhere near the bottom. I like a nice meal, but find myself happiest in a cute cafe with major design cred or a small hole-in-the-wall that’s been around for a few decades. This trip, I decided to switch things up and dig into the fine dining scene by planning an epic food day that included stops at two of the city's most famous Michelin-approved restaurants.

Ginger is in high demand at Hong Kong's local wet markets. Local fruits and vegetables for sale at the wet market. A butcher at work.

The morning started with room service in my spacious Harbor View room at the classically-styled InterContinental Hong Kong, where I set myself up in front of the window to take in Hong Kong Island’s spectacular skyline. Having spent time at the top of the International Commerce Centre and Victoria’s Peak, I can confidently say that it is one of the best vantage points in the city.

I made my way down to the lobby, where I met executive sous chef Simon Kwok for a tour of a local wet market. In addition to manning the kitchen at the hotel’s massive breakfast buffet, the knowledgeable chef is available to take guests on guided food excursions around the city.

On any given day in Hong Kong, you are bound to come across a few wet markets, but for the full experience (cages filled with clucking chickens, streets lined with plastic bins of flapping fish, and baskets upon baskets of tropical fruit) Mongkok Local Market is the spot. Navigating a wet market is easy enough, but having Kwok on hand made it feel more like an experience. Much of the fruit for sale were new-to-me species that he was able to identify and describe. For picky eaters like me, it was nice having someone explain the snacks, including a bowl of fresh tofu sprinkled with brown sugar that Kwok described as a favorite childhood treat. Pro tip: When visiting wet markets, it is always smart to wear a pair of close-toed shoes, as the streets are filled with all kinds of unidentifiable liquids.

Executive chef Lau Yiu Fai at work. A few of our dumplings.

From there I made my way back to the hotel to wash up before heading downstairs for a private dim sum class. Most luxury hotels in HK, including mine, have several notable restaurants, including Rech by Alain Ducasse (the first international outpost of the famous Paris seafood restaurant and recipient of one Michelin star) and Nobu, but Yan Toh Heen is the one you don’t want to miss. The two Michelin-star restaurant dishes up outstanding Cantonese cuisine in an elegant dining room with hand-carved jade accents and stunning harbor views. Along with one of his sous chefs, executive chef Lau Yiu Fai took me through an hour-long crash course in the art of dumpling making. From the easy-to-master triangle fold to the more complex pleated crescent, I learned the various techniques used to craft beautiful dumplings.

A sampling of Yan Toh Heen's famous dumplings. Basil dragon pearls served with ginger ice cream.

Lunch in the dining room started off with steaming baskets of dumplings we had created, followed by the restaurant’s famous Peking duck, which must be ordered at least 24 hours in advance. The dish is served over two courses. First, the crispy skin is paired with thin pancakes and an elaborate display of condiments and sauces. Later, a plate of minced duck is accompanied by crisp lettuce wraps. A sampling of the restaurant’s most beloved deserts followed, including a striking bowl of creamy ginger panna cotta layered with black basil seeds and a refreshing scoop of ginger ice cream. In traditional Chinese style, the meal ended with a piping hot cup of green tea, to help with digestion.

Michelin star food for a song at Tim Ho Wan.

Later that evening, after a much needed siesta, I left the hotel for an hour-long walk to the final stop of my food-packed agenda. A subway or bus could have had me there in less than a half hour, but exercise sounded like a good idea before tucking into my next meal. The Sham Shui Po outpost of Tim Ho Wan, a Hong Kong-based dim sum chain, is the lowest priced restaurant in the world to get a Michelin star. And with dinner for two coming in at around $25 USD, diners can expect to feast at a shockingly affordable price point. I was able to spot the unassuming restaurant thanks to a small line near the door, but, to my surprise, I only had to wait about fifteen minutes. English menus (if requested) offer 25 different dim sum choices. Highlights included baked bun with barbecue pork (a restaurant speciality) and steamed beef balls. The meal was good, but not necessarily worth all the hype, in my opinion. Nonetheless, it’s worth the trek if you like the idea of eating a Michelin star for the price of a sandwich.


For Michelin-Star Dumplings and Cantonese Fine Dining, Head to Hong Kong’s Kowloon Neighborhood

The scene at Mongkok Local Market. All photos by Berit Baugher.

No need to stay on Hong Kong Island for a good meal. Foodies can make an epic, finger-licking tour for themselves on the mainland, in Kowloon.

HONG KONG &mdash If there was one takeaway from my week-long trip to Hong Kong, it would be that the city and its seven million inhabitants take Michelin stars very seriously. Considered the culinary capital of Asia, Hong Kong’s rich and varied food scene has garnered a reputation as one of the world’s best places to dine, so it was understandable (and amusing) to discover just how much locals talk about the accreditation. From the taxi driver who picked me up at the airport to the proprietor at Charms Tailor who made my fiancé a beautiful bespoke suit, talk of Hong Kong’s 74 Michelin-starred restaurants came up in just about every conversation.

On the long list of things I like to do and see in new cities, fancy restaurants usually land somewhere near the bottom. I like a nice meal, but find myself happiest in a cute cafe with major design cred or a small hole-in-the-wall that’s been around for a few decades. This trip, I decided to switch things up and dig into the fine dining scene by planning an epic food day that included stops at two of the city's most famous Michelin-approved restaurants.

Ginger is in high demand at Hong Kong's local wet markets. Local fruits and vegetables for sale at the wet market. A butcher at work.

The morning started with room service in my spacious Harbor View room at the classically-styled InterContinental Hong Kong, where I set myself up in front of the window to take in Hong Kong Island’s spectacular skyline. Having spent time at the top of the International Commerce Centre and Victoria’s Peak, I can confidently say that it is one of the best vantage points in the city.

I made my way down to the lobby, where I met executive sous chef Simon Kwok for a tour of a local wet market. In addition to manning the kitchen at the hotel’s massive breakfast buffet, the knowledgeable chef is available to take guests on guided food excursions around the city.

On any given day in Hong Kong, you are bound to come across a few wet markets, but for the full experience (cages filled with clucking chickens, streets lined with plastic bins of flapping fish, and baskets upon baskets of tropical fruit) Mongkok Local Market is the spot. Navigating a wet market is easy enough, but having Kwok on hand made it feel more like an experience. Much of the fruit for sale were new-to-me species that he was able to identify and describe. For picky eaters like me, it was nice having someone explain the snacks, including a bowl of fresh tofu sprinkled with brown sugar that Kwok described as a favorite childhood treat. Pro tip: When visiting wet markets, it is always smart to wear a pair of close-toed shoes, as the streets are filled with all kinds of unidentifiable liquids.

Executive chef Lau Yiu Fai at work. A few of our dumplings.

From there I made my way back to the hotel to wash up before heading downstairs for a private dim sum class. Most luxury hotels in HK, including mine, have several notable restaurants, including Rech by Alain Ducasse (the first international outpost of the famous Paris seafood restaurant and recipient of one Michelin star) and Nobu, but Yan Toh Heen is the one you don’t want to miss. The two Michelin-star restaurant dishes up outstanding Cantonese cuisine in an elegant dining room with hand-carved jade accents and stunning harbor views. Along with one of his sous chefs, executive chef Lau Yiu Fai took me through an hour-long crash course in the art of dumpling making. From the easy-to-master triangle fold to the more complex pleated crescent, I learned the various techniques used to craft beautiful dumplings.

A sampling of Yan Toh Heen's famous dumplings. Basil dragon pearls served with ginger ice cream.

Lunch in the dining room started off with steaming baskets of dumplings we had created, followed by the restaurant’s famous Peking duck, which must be ordered at least 24 hours in advance. The dish is served over two courses. First, the crispy skin is paired with thin pancakes and an elaborate display of condiments and sauces. Later, a plate of minced duck is accompanied by crisp lettuce wraps. A sampling of the restaurant’s most beloved deserts followed, including a striking bowl of creamy ginger panna cotta layered with black basil seeds and a refreshing scoop of ginger ice cream. In traditional Chinese style, the meal ended with a piping hot cup of green tea, to help with digestion.

Michelin star food for a song at Tim Ho Wan.

Later that evening, after a much needed siesta, I left the hotel for an hour-long walk to the final stop of my food-packed agenda. A subway or bus could have had me there in less than a half hour, but exercise sounded like a good idea before tucking into my next meal. The Sham Shui Po outpost of Tim Ho Wan, a Hong Kong-based dim sum chain, is the lowest priced restaurant in the world to get a Michelin star. And with dinner for two coming in at around $25 USD, diners can expect to feast at a shockingly affordable price point. I was able to spot the unassuming restaurant thanks to a small line near the door, but, to my surprise, I only had to wait about fifteen minutes. English menus (if requested) offer 25 different dim sum choices. Highlights included baked bun with barbecue pork (a restaurant speciality) and steamed beef balls. The meal was good, but not necessarily worth all the hype, in my opinion. Nonetheless, it’s worth the trek if you like the idea of eating a Michelin star for the price of a sandwich.


For Michelin-Star Dumplings and Cantonese Fine Dining, Head to Hong Kong’s Kowloon Neighborhood

The scene at Mongkok Local Market. All photos by Berit Baugher.

No need to stay on Hong Kong Island for a good meal. Foodies can make an epic, finger-licking tour for themselves on the mainland, in Kowloon.

HONG KONG &mdash If there was one takeaway from my week-long trip to Hong Kong, it would be that the city and its seven million inhabitants take Michelin stars very seriously. Considered the culinary capital of Asia, Hong Kong’s rich and varied food scene has garnered a reputation as one of the world’s best places to dine, so it was understandable (and amusing) to discover just how much locals talk about the accreditation. From the taxi driver who picked me up at the airport to the proprietor at Charms Tailor who made my fiancé a beautiful bespoke suit, talk of Hong Kong’s 74 Michelin-starred restaurants came up in just about every conversation.

On the long list of things I like to do and see in new cities, fancy restaurants usually land somewhere near the bottom. I like a nice meal, but find myself happiest in a cute cafe with major design cred or a small hole-in-the-wall that’s been around for a few decades. This trip, I decided to switch things up and dig into the fine dining scene by planning an epic food day that included stops at two of the city's most famous Michelin-approved restaurants.

Ginger is in high demand at Hong Kong's local wet markets. Local fruits and vegetables for sale at the wet market. A butcher at work.

The morning started with room service in my spacious Harbor View room at the classically-styled InterContinental Hong Kong, where I set myself up in front of the window to take in Hong Kong Island’s spectacular skyline. Having spent time at the top of the International Commerce Centre and Victoria’s Peak, I can confidently say that it is one of the best vantage points in the city.

I made my way down to the lobby, where I met executive sous chef Simon Kwok for a tour of a local wet market. In addition to manning the kitchen at the hotel’s massive breakfast buffet, the knowledgeable chef is available to take guests on guided food excursions around the city.

On any given day in Hong Kong, you are bound to come across a few wet markets, but for the full experience (cages filled with clucking chickens, streets lined with plastic bins of flapping fish, and baskets upon baskets of tropical fruit) Mongkok Local Market is the spot. Navigating a wet market is easy enough, but having Kwok on hand made it feel more like an experience. Much of the fruit for sale were new-to-me species that he was able to identify and describe. For picky eaters like me, it was nice having someone explain the snacks, including a bowl of fresh tofu sprinkled with brown sugar that Kwok described as a favorite childhood treat. Pro tip: When visiting wet markets, it is always smart to wear a pair of close-toed shoes, as the streets are filled with all kinds of unidentifiable liquids.

Executive chef Lau Yiu Fai at work. A few of our dumplings.

From there I made my way back to the hotel to wash up before heading downstairs for a private dim sum class. Most luxury hotels in HK, including mine, have several notable restaurants, including Rech by Alain Ducasse (the first international outpost of the famous Paris seafood restaurant and recipient of one Michelin star) and Nobu, but Yan Toh Heen is the one you don’t want to miss. The two Michelin-star restaurant dishes up outstanding Cantonese cuisine in an elegant dining room with hand-carved jade accents and stunning harbor views. Along with one of his sous chefs, executive chef Lau Yiu Fai took me through an hour-long crash course in the art of dumpling making. From the easy-to-master triangle fold to the more complex pleated crescent, I learned the various techniques used to craft beautiful dumplings.

A sampling of Yan Toh Heen's famous dumplings. Basil dragon pearls served with ginger ice cream.

Lunch in the dining room started off with steaming baskets of dumplings we had created, followed by the restaurant’s famous Peking duck, which must be ordered at least 24 hours in advance. The dish is served over two courses. First, the crispy skin is paired with thin pancakes and an elaborate display of condiments and sauces. Later, a plate of minced duck is accompanied by crisp lettuce wraps. A sampling of the restaurant’s most beloved deserts followed, including a striking bowl of creamy ginger panna cotta layered with black basil seeds and a refreshing scoop of ginger ice cream. In traditional Chinese style, the meal ended with a piping hot cup of green tea, to help with digestion.

Michelin star food for a song at Tim Ho Wan.

Later that evening, after a much needed siesta, I left the hotel for an hour-long walk to the final stop of my food-packed agenda. A subway or bus could have had me there in less than a half hour, but exercise sounded like a good idea before tucking into my next meal. The Sham Shui Po outpost of Tim Ho Wan, a Hong Kong-based dim sum chain, is the lowest priced restaurant in the world to get a Michelin star. And with dinner for two coming in at around $25 USD, diners can expect to feast at a shockingly affordable price point. I was able to spot the unassuming restaurant thanks to a small line near the door, but, to my surprise, I only had to wait about fifteen minutes. English menus (if requested) offer 25 different dim sum choices. Highlights included baked bun with barbecue pork (a restaurant speciality) and steamed beef balls. The meal was good, but not necessarily worth all the hype, in my opinion. Nonetheless, it’s worth the trek if you like the idea of eating a Michelin star for the price of a sandwich.


For Michelin-Star Dumplings and Cantonese Fine Dining, Head to Hong Kong’s Kowloon Neighborhood

The scene at Mongkok Local Market. All photos by Berit Baugher.

No need to stay on Hong Kong Island for a good meal. Foodies can make an epic, finger-licking tour for themselves on the mainland, in Kowloon.

HONG KONG &mdash If there was one takeaway from my week-long trip to Hong Kong, it would be that the city and its seven million inhabitants take Michelin stars very seriously. Considered the culinary capital of Asia, Hong Kong’s rich and varied food scene has garnered a reputation as one of the world’s best places to dine, so it was understandable (and amusing) to discover just how much locals talk about the accreditation. From the taxi driver who picked me up at the airport to the proprietor at Charms Tailor who made my fiancé a beautiful bespoke suit, talk of Hong Kong’s 74 Michelin-starred restaurants came up in just about every conversation.

On the long list of things I like to do and see in new cities, fancy restaurants usually land somewhere near the bottom. I like a nice meal, but find myself happiest in a cute cafe with major design cred or a small hole-in-the-wall that’s been around for a few decades. This trip, I decided to switch things up and dig into the fine dining scene by planning an epic food day that included stops at two of the city's most famous Michelin-approved restaurants.

Ginger is in high demand at Hong Kong's local wet markets. Local fruits and vegetables for sale at the wet market. A butcher at work.

The morning started with room service in my spacious Harbor View room at the classically-styled InterContinental Hong Kong, where I set myself up in front of the window to take in Hong Kong Island’s spectacular skyline. Having spent time at the top of the International Commerce Centre and Victoria’s Peak, I can confidently say that it is one of the best vantage points in the city.

I made my way down to the lobby, where I met executive sous chef Simon Kwok for a tour of a local wet market. In addition to manning the kitchen at the hotel’s massive breakfast buffet, the knowledgeable chef is available to take guests on guided food excursions around the city.

On any given day in Hong Kong, you are bound to come across a few wet markets, but for the full experience (cages filled with clucking chickens, streets lined with plastic bins of flapping fish, and baskets upon baskets of tropical fruit) Mongkok Local Market is the spot. Navigating a wet market is easy enough, but having Kwok on hand made it feel more like an experience. Much of the fruit for sale were new-to-me species that he was able to identify and describe. For picky eaters like me, it was nice having someone explain the snacks, including a bowl of fresh tofu sprinkled with brown sugar that Kwok described as a favorite childhood treat. Pro tip: When visiting wet markets, it is always smart to wear a pair of close-toed shoes, as the streets are filled with all kinds of unidentifiable liquids.

Executive chef Lau Yiu Fai at work. A few of our dumplings.

From there I made my way back to the hotel to wash up before heading downstairs for a private dim sum class. Most luxury hotels in HK, including mine, have several notable restaurants, including Rech by Alain Ducasse (the first international outpost of the famous Paris seafood restaurant and recipient of one Michelin star) and Nobu, but Yan Toh Heen is the one you don’t want to miss. The two Michelin-star restaurant dishes up outstanding Cantonese cuisine in an elegant dining room with hand-carved jade accents and stunning harbor views. Along with one of his sous chefs, executive chef Lau Yiu Fai took me through an hour-long crash course in the art of dumpling making. From the easy-to-master triangle fold to the more complex pleated crescent, I learned the various techniques used to craft beautiful dumplings.

A sampling of Yan Toh Heen's famous dumplings. Basil dragon pearls served with ginger ice cream.

Lunch in the dining room started off with steaming baskets of dumplings we had created, followed by the restaurant’s famous Peking duck, which must be ordered at least 24 hours in advance. The dish is served over two courses. First, the crispy skin is paired with thin pancakes and an elaborate display of condiments and sauces. Later, a plate of minced duck is accompanied by crisp lettuce wraps. A sampling of the restaurant’s most beloved deserts followed, including a striking bowl of creamy ginger panna cotta layered with black basil seeds and a refreshing scoop of ginger ice cream. In traditional Chinese style, the meal ended with a piping hot cup of green tea, to help with digestion.

Michelin star food for a song at Tim Ho Wan.

Later that evening, after a much needed siesta, I left the hotel for an hour-long walk to the final stop of my food-packed agenda. A subway or bus could have had me there in less than a half hour, but exercise sounded like a good idea before tucking into my next meal. The Sham Shui Po outpost of Tim Ho Wan, a Hong Kong-based dim sum chain, is the lowest priced restaurant in the world to get a Michelin star. And with dinner for two coming in at around $25 USD, diners can expect to feast at a shockingly affordable price point. I was able to spot the unassuming restaurant thanks to a small line near the door, but, to my surprise, I only had to wait about fifteen minutes. English menus (if requested) offer 25 different dim sum choices. Highlights included baked bun with barbecue pork (a restaurant speciality) and steamed beef balls. The meal was good, but not necessarily worth all the hype, in my opinion. Nonetheless, it’s worth the trek if you like the idea of eating a Michelin star for the price of a sandwich.


For Michelin-Star Dumplings and Cantonese Fine Dining, Head to Hong Kong’s Kowloon Neighborhood

The scene at Mongkok Local Market. All photos by Berit Baugher.

No need to stay on Hong Kong Island for a good meal. Foodies can make an epic, finger-licking tour for themselves on the mainland, in Kowloon.

HONG KONG &mdash If there was one takeaway from my week-long trip to Hong Kong, it would be that the city and its seven million inhabitants take Michelin stars very seriously. Considered the culinary capital of Asia, Hong Kong’s rich and varied food scene has garnered a reputation as one of the world’s best places to dine, so it was understandable (and amusing) to discover just how much locals talk about the accreditation. From the taxi driver who picked me up at the airport to the proprietor at Charms Tailor who made my fiancé a beautiful bespoke suit, talk of Hong Kong’s 74 Michelin-starred restaurants came up in just about every conversation.

On the long list of things I like to do and see in new cities, fancy restaurants usually land somewhere near the bottom. I like a nice meal, but find myself happiest in a cute cafe with major design cred or a small hole-in-the-wall that’s been around for a few decades. This trip, I decided to switch things up and dig into the fine dining scene by planning an epic food day that included stops at two of the city's most famous Michelin-approved restaurants.

Ginger is in high demand at Hong Kong's local wet markets. Local fruits and vegetables for sale at the wet market. A butcher at work.

The morning started with room service in my spacious Harbor View room at the classically-styled InterContinental Hong Kong, where I set myself up in front of the window to take in Hong Kong Island’s spectacular skyline. Having spent time at the top of the International Commerce Centre and Victoria’s Peak, I can confidently say that it is one of the best vantage points in the city.

I made my way down to the lobby, where I met executive sous chef Simon Kwok for a tour of a local wet market. In addition to manning the kitchen at the hotel’s massive breakfast buffet, the knowledgeable chef is available to take guests on guided food excursions around the city.

On any given day in Hong Kong, you are bound to come across a few wet markets, but for the full experience (cages filled with clucking chickens, streets lined with plastic bins of flapping fish, and baskets upon baskets of tropical fruit) Mongkok Local Market is the spot. Navigating a wet market is easy enough, but having Kwok on hand made it feel more like an experience. Much of the fruit for sale were new-to-me species that he was able to identify and describe. For picky eaters like me, it was nice having someone explain the snacks, including a bowl of fresh tofu sprinkled with brown sugar that Kwok described as a favorite childhood treat. Pro tip: When visiting wet markets, it is always smart to wear a pair of close-toed shoes, as the streets are filled with all kinds of unidentifiable liquids.

Executive chef Lau Yiu Fai at work. A few of our dumplings.

From there I made my way back to the hotel to wash up before heading downstairs for a private dim sum class. Most luxury hotels in HK, including mine, have several notable restaurants, including Rech by Alain Ducasse (the first international outpost of the famous Paris seafood restaurant and recipient of one Michelin star) and Nobu, but Yan Toh Heen is the one you don’t want to miss. The two Michelin-star restaurant dishes up outstanding Cantonese cuisine in an elegant dining room with hand-carved jade accents and stunning harbor views. Along with one of his sous chefs, executive chef Lau Yiu Fai took me through an hour-long crash course in the art of dumpling making. From the easy-to-master triangle fold to the more complex pleated crescent, I learned the various techniques used to craft beautiful dumplings.

A sampling of Yan Toh Heen's famous dumplings. Basil dragon pearls served with ginger ice cream.

Lunch in the dining room started off with steaming baskets of dumplings we had created, followed by the restaurant’s famous Peking duck, which must be ordered at least 24 hours in advance. The dish is served over two courses. First, the crispy skin is paired with thin pancakes and an elaborate display of condiments and sauces. Later, a plate of minced duck is accompanied by crisp lettuce wraps. A sampling of the restaurant’s most beloved deserts followed, including a striking bowl of creamy ginger panna cotta layered with black basil seeds and a refreshing scoop of ginger ice cream. In traditional Chinese style, the meal ended with a piping hot cup of green tea, to help with digestion.

Michelin star food for a song at Tim Ho Wan.

Later that evening, after a much needed siesta, I left the hotel for an hour-long walk to the final stop of my food-packed agenda. A subway or bus could have had me there in less than a half hour, but exercise sounded like a good idea before tucking into my next meal. The Sham Shui Po outpost of Tim Ho Wan, a Hong Kong-based dim sum chain, is the lowest priced restaurant in the world to get a Michelin star. And with dinner for two coming in at around $25 USD, diners can expect to feast at a shockingly affordable price point. I was able to spot the unassuming restaurant thanks to a small line near the door, but, to my surprise, I only had to wait about fifteen minutes. English menus (if requested) offer 25 different dim sum choices. Highlights included baked bun with barbecue pork (a restaurant speciality) and steamed beef balls. The meal was good, but not necessarily worth all the hype, in my opinion. Nonetheless, it’s worth the trek if you like the idea of eating a Michelin star for the price of a sandwich.